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What Is Selvage in Sewing?

What Is Selvage in Sewing?

Selvage is a term used in sewing that refers to the edge of a fabric that is meant to be kept intact. This can be done for a number of reasons, such as preventing raveling or creating a finished look. When it comes to selvage, there are two main types: self-finished and unfinished.

Self-finished selvage is created by weaving an extra strip of fabric into the edge of the cloth. This strip is then cut off after the fabric is sewn, leaving a clean and finished edge. Unfinished selvage, on the other hand, does not have this extra strip woven in. Instead, it’s left raw and can fray over time.

Most fabrics use one type or the other of selvage, but there are some exceptions. Knit fabrics, for example, typically use unfinished selvage because it doesn’t fray when cut. Selvage can also be found on some blankets and towels.

When deciding whether to keep or remove selvage from your project, it’s important to consider both its function and appearance. If you’re looking for added durability or a polished finish, then keeping the selvage may be your best option. But if you don’t need those benefits or if they’re outweighed by aesthetics, then cutting it away may be preferable.

What Is Selvage In Sewing?

If you’re new to sewing, you might have come across the term “selvage” and been wondering what it is. Selvage is the finished edge on a bolt of fabric that prevents it from unraveling. When you buy fabric by the yard at the store, you typically cut off the selvage before sewing with it. In this post, we’ll discuss what selvage is in more detail and why you need to remove it before sewing.

Selvage is the term used to describe the finished edges on a fabric. When you purchase fabric, the selvage edges are usually the ends of the bolt. Selvages are usually straight of grain and parallel to the selvage edge of the fabric. The term “selvage” can also refer to a type of finish that some manufacturers put on the edges of their fabric to keep it from unraveling.

There are several types of selvage finishes, but not all fabrics have selvages. Some common types of selvages include:

– Sewn: A line of stitches is sewn close to the edge of the fabric to prevent unraveling.

– Pinked: The fabric is cut with a serrated blade to prevent unraveling.

– Hemmed: The fabric is folded over and stitched down to prevent unraveling.

– Merrowed: The fabric is finished with an overlock stitch to prevent unraveling.

Not all fabrics have selvages, but many woven fabrics do. If you’re not sure if your fabric has selvages, you can usually tell by looking at the edges. Selvage edges are usually straight of grain and parallel to the selvage edge of the fabric.

If you’re working with a fabric that has selvages, you’ll want to take them into account when cutting your fabric pieces. In some cases, you may want to include the selvage edges in your project. In other cases, you may want to cut them off.


What Is Selvage?


Selvage is the verb meaning to prepare (an edge) so that it will not ravel or fray. … The long sides of a bolt of fabric are usually finished with selvage. This keeps the fabric from raveling or fraying and makes sure that both selvedges are exactly parallel to each other.

The selvage is important because it provides a stable edge for cutting and sewing. When you are cutting out your pattern pieces, you will want to make sure that you include the selvage so that your finished garment will last longer and not fall apart at the seams.

In some cases, you may want to remove the selvage before sewing. This can be helpful if your fabric is particularly thick or if the selvage is preventing your fabric from lying flat. To remove the selvage, simply cut it away with scissors or a rotary cutter.

Why Should I Remove Selvage Before Sewing?


There are a few reasons why you should remove the selvage before sewing:

  1. Most commercial fabrics are wider than 36 inches, so you don’t need the selvage for stability.
  2. The selvage can be stiffer than the rest of the fabric and doesn’t always iron flat, which can make your finished project look less than professional.
  3. On some fabrics, one side of the selvage is neater than the other. Once you’ve removed the selvage, both sides of your fabric will have clean edges.
  4. Removing the selvage gives you a chance to prewash your fabric before starting your project (which is always a good idea).
  5. Some people find that their sewing machine tracks better without the selvages in the way.

Selvedge vs Selvage

Selvedge and selvage are often used interchangeably, but they technically have different meanings. Selvedge refers to the woven edge of a fabric that is finished so it won’t unravel. Selvage is the term used to describe the type of finish that is applied to the selvedge edges. Not all fabrics have selvedges, but many woven fabrics do. If you’re not sure if your fabric has selvages, you can usually tell by looking at the edges. Selvage edges are usually straight of grain and parallel to the selvage edge of the fabric.

All About Fringe Selvedge Denim

There’s nothing like a great pair of denim jeans. They’re comfortable, they go with everything, and they can last for years with proper care. . In fact, there’s a whole world of different types of denim, from raw selvedge to stretch to distressed. And within each type, there are endless variations to choose from.

One type of denim that has become increasingly popular in recent years is fringe selvedge. This unique style combines the traditional look of selvedge jeans with the fun and funky vibe of fringe. But what exactly is fringe selvedge denim? Let’s take a closer look.

What Is Selvedge Denim?

Selvedge denim is made on traditional shuttle looms rather than the newer, faster projectile looms that are used to create non-selvedge denim. The slower production process results in a stronger and more consistent fabric. The selvedge can also be easily identified by the distinctive colored edge that runs along the side of the fabric (usually red or blue).

How Is Selvedge Denim Made?


Selvedge denim is made on traditional shuttle looms. Shuttle looms are different from modern industrial looms in several ways. First, shuttle looms are much slower than industrial looms, which means that they can only produce a limited amount of fabric each day. Second, shuttle looms weave the fabric in one continuous length, rather than cutting it into shorter lengths after it’s been woven. This give selvedge denim its signature self-finished edges.

Why Is Selvedge Denim So Popular?


Selvedge denim has surged in popularity in recent years for a few reasons. First, the traditional methods used to produce selvedge denim are becoming increasingly rare, which makes selvedge denim feel like a unique and special product. Second, selvedge denim’s durability and classic good looks make it a popular choice for both casual and formal wear. If you’re looking for a high-quality pair of jeans that will last you for years to come, selvedge denim is definitely the way to go!

What Is Fringe Selvedge Denim?


Fringe selvedge denim is a style of selvedge denim that features fringe along the seams. The fringe can be made from the same fabric as the jeans or from a contrasting fabric (such as suede or leather). Fringe selvedge jeans are often considered to be more fashion-forward than traditional selvedge jeans because of the added element of fun and personality that the fringe brings to the table.

If you’re looking for a unique twist on traditional selvedge denim, then fringe selvedge is definitely worth checking out. This trendy style combines the best of both worlds, offering both durability and personality. So whether you’re hitting the town or just kicking back at home, your fringe selvedge jeans are sure to turn heads!

Tuck-in selvedge

The tuck-in selvedge is a type of selvage finish that is achieved by folding the fabric over and stitching it down. This type of selvage is often used on lightweight fabrics that are prone to unraveling.

Pinked selvedge

The pinked selvedge is a type of selvage finish that is achieved by cutting the fabric with a serrated blade. This type of selvage is often used on medium to heavyweight fabrics that are not prone to unraveling.

Merrowed selvedge

The merrowed selvedge is a type of selvage finish that is achieved by finishing the fabric with an overlock stitch. This type of selvage is often used on medium to heavyweight fabrics that are not prone to unraveling.

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